Digital Music

With music constantly progressing artists are always trying to find new ways to create new sounds.   With the increased simplicity of music creation softwares such as Ableton and Logic it is becoming more and more popular to turn to your laptop as a means of creating music.  Artists such as Wise Blood, Dirty Beaches, and Flying Lotus create most, if not all of their instrumental elements to their songs solely on their computers.  Live shows from artists such as this consist of pushing buttons on launch pads at certain times in order to get the right clips of music to play.  This type of musical performance has been deemed unworthy by many who believe that this type of music requires less skill and cannot be considered “live music”.  However the musicians making this music believe that the performances that they do live are just as valid as those of a four-piece band “We create tracks in the studio in the normal fashion,” says J Tonal of The Flying Skulls. “They get broken up in to drum and bass parts, which get played live on the MPC, melody and lead parts which get played on the MS2000, and samples and other melody parts which get broken down into [Ableton] Live clips and played from [an M-Audio] Trigger Finger.”(createdigitalmusic.com)

Along with this new wave of electronic music also comes a very controversial musical topic, the heavy usage of sampling.  Sampling is when an artist takes a small clip of an existing song and puts it into their song as part of their own work.  By description this process probably seems like theft however when put into action sampling requires the artist to think outside the box of conventional music.  For example listen to the song “What Would I Want, Sky” By Animal Collective

And “Unbroken Chain” by The Grateful Dead

Although Animal collective took part of their song and put it in their own it sounds completely different and in no way sounds like they are stealing from The Grateful Dead.

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